And the Oscar Goes to…All the King’s Men

It took a while, but we finally reached the end of the 1940s. I’m thankful to say the decade is ending on a good, I might even say fantastic, note. It’s a political drama directed and written by Robert Rossen and starring Broderick Crawford in a role that won him an Oscar for Best Actor. Supposedly based on the life of Louisiana politician Huey Long, All the King’s Men (1949) tells the story of Willie Stark, an idealistic man turned corrupt when he becomes Governor of an unnamed U.S. state. It’s a harsh, hard hitting story that still hits all the right notes, remaining just as relevant as ever. Also nominated for Best Director, Best Screenplay, Best Supporting Actor for John Ireland, Best Supporting Actress for radio veteran but film newcomer Mercedes McCambridge (who ended up taking home the award), and Best Editing for Robert Parrish and Al Clark, this is the Best Picture of 1949.

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My Top Five “And the Oscar Goes To…” Missed Opportunities

I do promise to start doing more text reviews soon, and the Gentleman’s Agreement video will be up as soon as I can get it done (real life stuff may delay it a bit, though). Until then, here’s a short video where I explore some of my biggest mistake and missed opportunities in my Oscar videos. Hope you enjoy!

Selma

SelmaTwo things I hate: racism and politics. I don’t like to bring the latter into this blog. This is not a political soapbox but a place to discuss movies. That being said, films can be political, and it is impossible for me to review Selma without dragging politics into it. So here we go. Continue reading