And the Oscar Goes to…All About Eve

All About Eve hits a number of landmarks. It’s the first Best Picture winner to be primarily about women, it received an unprecedented 14 Oscar nominations, and well, watch my review to find out the rest. It stars Bette Davis, Anne Baxter, Celeste Holm, and George Sanders. It’s directed and written by Joseph L. Mankiewicz. It’s the Best Picture winner of 1950. It’s a tale of the theater like no other. It’s All About Eve.

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Talking Pictures: Episode 3 – The 2017 Best Picture Oscar Nominees

With the Oscars coming up tomorrow, what better way for you to spend part of your Saturday than listening to a friend of mine and I talk about this year’s Best Picture nominees. We discuss their highs, lows, what we think will take home the big award and what we think won’t. There’s time for a few more discussions. Why not make this one of them.

And the Oscar Goes to…: Gentleman’s Agreement

Gregory Peck’s agent advised the actor not to take the lead role in Gentleman’s Agreement (1947). It was thought that it would ruin Peck’s career, not an unreasonable assumption. The film deals with the prevalent issue of antisemitism in the United States. That was a difficult and controversial topic in the late 1940s, but producer Darryl F. Zanuck made the movie anyway. The film turned out to be a surprise hit with audiences and critics, wining three Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Supporting Actress for Celeste Holm, and Best Director for Elia Kazan. Also, starring Dorothy McGuire and John Garfield, this is Gentleman’s Agreement.