The Monster Mash: The Invisible Man

The Invisible Man

“A few chemicals mixed together, that’s all, and flesh and blood and bone just fade away.”

When I first read it in sixth grade, H.G. Wells’s The Invisible Man (1897) captured my imagination. I was dying for a film adaption. One night, my wish was answered when I landed on a black-and-white 1933 film playing on TCM. I was enthralled by the work of James Whale, Claude Rains and special effects wizard John P. Fulton, who created a film that’s as fascinating and interesting as its source material.

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And the Oscar Goes to…: Casablanca

Here is the long awaited new entry in my Best Picture Oscar series (the last really new entry was Mrs. Miniver, and up until now I’ve been playing catch up and producing video reviews for my first six entries, which were text reviews only). With this addition comes a change. From now on, the Best Picture reviews will only be available as a video review. Most other reviews on the site will still be in text form but this series won’t. Well, I say that, but if enough people say they want a text review as well, I’ll start providing them again. Let me know. I really want to know your thoughts. Anyway, here’s my review of Casablanca (1942) starring Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henreid, Claude Rains, Conrad Veidt, Peter Lorre, and Sidney Greenstreet. It also won Best Director for Michael Curtiz and Best Screenplay for Julius J. Epstein, Phillip G. Epstein, and Howard E. Koch.

I Totally F***ing Love This Movie Blogathon: The Invisible Man

Note: This post is a late submission to the blogathon started by the great Kitty Packard. If anyone is not reading her wonderful blog, which you really should, you can find it here: http://kittypackard.com/

The Invisible Man

When I was in the sixth grade or so, the class had a reading day. We brought blankets and sleeping bags from home, sprawled out on the floor, and just read whatever we wished. The book I had picked off the library’s shelf was one by a famous sci-fi author, who I had probably heard of but had never read. When I took the book with me to class on the aforementioned day, I found I quite enjoyed it. Later, I told a friend of mine about the book, mentioning how I wished someone would make it into a movie. There was such a film, she said. For God knows how many years after that conversation, I imagined what the movie would be like. Then one day, I was watching TCM and it came on.

It opened with a man walking through a harsh winter blizzard. The man was tightly wrapped in heavy, warm clothes. He had a wide brimmed hat casting a shadow over his face, which was covered in gauze bandages. He walked into an inn filled with merry people laughing and having a drink. With his arrival, everything went quiet and he asked for a room. After being left alone in his new lodgings, he took off his coat and removed the bandages to reveal himself as the Invisible Man.

The Invisibe Man at the beginning of the film.

The Invisibe Man at the beginning of the film.

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